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Grief Counseling Certification Program Article on Losing a Child

The sad reality of losing a child is the worse loss one can experience in life.  This article looks into it and how one again finds meaning in their work.

Losing a child can make any meaning in one's life vanish. Please also review our Grief Counseling Certification Program

Losing a child can make any meaning in one’s life vanish. Please also review our Grief Counseling Certification Program

Please also review our Grief Counseling Certification Program

The article, Finding meaning in work after the death of my child, by Jacqueline Dooley states,

“For the past 15 years, I’ve worked from my home office — a tiny room sandwiched between my daughters’ bedrooms. My job requires nothing more than a computer, an Internet connection and a phone.

I got lucky. I’ve been home for the entirety of my daughters’ lives — always a room or two away, ready to rearrange my day to fit them neatly inside it. I’ve reconfigured my work schedule to align with each stage of their development. At first that meant working during nap time or at night. As they got older, I worked around day care and school hours.

The unexpected consequence of parenting at work and working while parenting is that the two have become inextricably linked. I don’t have a work life and a home life. For me, it’s always been one life.

This has made the nature of the work I do seem much more meaningful than it actually is. Online marketing is not a job that fills my soul with joy. It’s fascinating and challenging and often rewarding, but the best part of my job is the freedom it gives me to be close to my children.

 

This became critical when my younger daughter, Emily, was born with medical issues that required me to step away from my home office for the better part of a year. It became essential when, after 10 years in business for myself, my older daughter, Ana, was diagnosed with cancer. By then, September 2012, I’d begun delegating some of my work to subcontractors. They took over when the world — and work — stopped for 40 days, and they helped me when my life started again.”

To read the entire article, please click here

Please also review our Grief Counseling Certification Program

 

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