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Grief Counseling Training Program Article on Marriage and Losing a Child

Losing a child is devastating at any age.  It can ruin lives and also a marriage as both overcome the grief in their own way.  Sometimes it can become toxic

Losing a child is hard on a couple. Please also review our grief counseling training program

Losing a child is hard on a couple. Please also review our grief counseling training program

This article looks at the troubles that may emerge and how to keep the union together.

Please also review our Grief Counseling Training Program

The article,” Keeping A Marriage Alive After The Loss Of A Child “, states

The most challenged relationship surrounding the death of a child is the union of the two people that created that child.

No one is prepared for the assault the loss of a child can have on a family, and most of all on a marriage. I experienced such tragic loss when my beautiful vibrant 16-year old son woke up with a fever and was dead the next morning of a deadly strain of bacterial meningitis. Our lives changed forever.

On the outside, my husband and I appeared to handle the loss with strength and grace, but inside we were dying.

On the outside, my husband and I appeared to handle the loss with strength and grace, but inside we were dying. Struggling through the grief process is hard enough as an individual, but making room for the feelings of your partner can be overwhelming. When my husband and I once enjoyed memories and stories of our history together, now, our history held our greatest tragedy. We mourned together, but more often we mourned separately.

On the night of our son’s death, we held hands, looked in each other’s eyes, and vowed to support each other through this. We had no idea where our bereavement might lead, we just knew we had to commit to our marriage and the parenting of our three living children.

We soon discovered how difficult it was. We struggled to be a vessel of comfort to each other, putting on our “I’m fine” face, but in reality we were drowning in the depths of despair.

As a parent, your demands are many. The pull of the missing child is often greater than your ability to stay emotionally present with your spouse. You may find yourself angry when your partner has a good day, and is happy, but you’re not.

To read the entire article, please click here

Please also review our Grief Counseling Training Program to learn more

 

 

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