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Miscarriages and Grief and How to Become a Certified Grief Counselor

Grief Counseling and Miscarriages and How to become a certified grief counselor

If you wish to learn how to become a certified grief counselor, then review

If you wish to learn how to become a certified grief counselor, then review

 

 

One of the hardest things to grief counsel is a miscarriage.  Miscarriages strip a woman of part of herself.  She feels the intimacy of the lost more than anyone else in the family.  The hormones, the emotion and the lost can become overbearing.  Perhaps the most painful aspect of the loss is that it was unseen.  Without any formal burial or ceremony, it can become a disenfranchised loss.

 

Clara Hinton writes about this horrible experience many women go through.  In her article, “Miscarriage Is Such An Empty Feeling”, she examines some of the thoughts, feelings and physical symptoms a woman must face.  Information is found from silentgrief.com

Miscarriage is a loss that is so difficult to explain to others. When child loss occurs through a miscarriage, it very seldom seems real to others because in an early miscarriage there is nothing that solidly validates a new life. A mother knows almost instantly that she is carrying a baby because her body goes through so many physical changes every day. Hormone levels are rapidly changing and things such as extreme fatigue, morning sickness, and a heightened sense of smell are all indicators that something is happening to a woman’s body.

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