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Pastoral Thanatology Training Program Article on Myths Surrounding Death

Good article about death and misconceptions that surround the moments of death.

Please also review our Pastoral Thanatology Training Program

Please also review our Pastoral Thanatology Training Program

A good read for those interested in pastoral care of the dying as well.  Please review our Pastoral Thanatology Training Program and see if it matches your academic and professional needs.

The article,”When life is coming to a close: three common myths about dying ” states,

“On average 435 Australians die each day. Most will know they are at the end of their lives. Hopefully they had time to contemplate and achieve the “good death” we all seek. It’s possible to get a good death in Australia thanks to our excellent healthcare system – in 2015, our death-care was ranked second in the world.

We have an excellent but chaotic system. Knowing where to find help, what questions to ask, and deciding what you want to happen at the end of your life is important. But there are some myths about dying that perhaps unexpectedly harm the dying person and deserve scrutiny.


 


Myth 1: positive thinking can delay death

The first myth is that positive thinking cures or delays death. It doesn’t. The cultivation of specific emotions does not change the fact that death is a biological process, brought about by an accident, or disease processes that have reached a point of no return.

Fighting the good fight, remaining positive by not talking about end of life, or avoiding palliative care, have not been shown to extend life. Instead, positive thinking may silence those who wish to talk about their death in a realistic way, to express negative emotions, realise their time is limited and plan effectively for a good death or access palliative care early, which has actually been shown to extend life.”

To read the entire article, please click here

Also please review our Pastoral Thanatology Training Program

 

 

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