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Category: Pastoral Thanatology RSS feed for this category

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The Price and Quality of End of Life Care

Pastoral Care Doesn’t Cost Anything But End of Life Decisions Can The high costs of end of life care are factors in pastoral care.  Some people can afford it and some cannot and pastoral care has to adjust to this.  Yet beyond the mere pastoral care element of caring for the dying, is the financial.  How can we increase quality and lower price?  There are many views on this. Ezekiel Emanual of the New York Times writes about finding better care for less in is article, “Better, if not, Cheaper Care” To read the entire article, please click here If

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Becoming certified in pastoral care

Becoming certified in pastoral care

Pastoral Care: The Cross of Old Age Growing older at times becomes a heartache as people lose abilities they once had.  No longer are certain hobbies or physical activities available to the aging body.  Also in many cases, unresolved middle age issues can still haunt the elderly.  Finding God and understanding one’s role as an elder is key.  Growing old with dignity is defintely a task that is difficult but possible with God.  Pastoral Care can help the elderly accept their final cross before death. Michael Taylor in his article “Ageing Gracefully Together-Pastoral Care of Older People” speaks about his

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End of Life Decisions Usually Made Too Late

End of Life Decisions Usually Made Too Late

End of Life End of life decisions sometimes are discussions that are taboo.  People are afraid to discuss them when they see a sick family member.  They fear that they are giving up or facing an end they are not ready to accept.  The inevitability of death scares many into avoiding the topic till it is too late. Kay Lazar of the Boston Globe discusses this issue and how people responded about how they view their end of life decisions in her article, “End of life Care Rarely Discussed” To read the article, please click here If you are interested in

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Pastoral Care: Burnout

Pastoral Care: Burnout

Pastoral Care and Burnout So many times, Pastoral Care can lead to burnout for ministers and other caregivers who attend to the mind, body and spirit of others.    Just like any field, stress can lead to burnout.  In the pastoral thanatology field many depend on the counselor to help them.   Try following this article to help you if you are feeling burnt out. Paul Vitello of the NY Times writes about pastoral burnout and the importance of relaxation for pastoral care givers in his article “Taking a Break From the Lord’s Work” To read the article, please click here If

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Dying With Dignity At Home: Checklist and Needs for the Home

Dying With Dignity At Home: Checklist and Needs for the Home

Pastoral Care for the Dying at Home Pastoral Care for the dying and Dying With Dignity at home is a sad but good choice if the loved one is capable of doing so.  It ensures comfort, dignity and peace for the dying person. Susan Seliger of the NY Time writes about the important things needed when preparing one’s home for a loved one’s final days in her article “Preparing For A Loved One To Die At Home” To read the article, please click here If you would like to learn more about Pastoral Care certifications, please review our site and

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Hospice and Palliative Care For Mesothelioma

Hospice and Palliative Care For Mesothelioma

Why Mesothelioma Patients Benefit from Palliative Care and Hospice Care hospice and palliative care are two different – but beneficial – forms of medical attention for mesothelioma patients. Although they both focus on making the patient as comfortable as possible, they are given with different intent. Palliative therapies refer to treatments that do not have the potential to cure the cancer but still provide symptom control benefits.  For mesothelioma patients, these therapies may reduce chest pain or dyspnea and dispel anxiety. Palliative care may even be able to help patients respond more positively to traditional mesothelioma treatments, such as surgeries

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Pastoral Counseling and Care: When to Pull the Plug?

Pastoral Counseling and Care: When to Pull the Plug?

Pastoral Counseling and Care Regarding Extraordinary Measures and Means As disheartening as it may be, there may be a time when we have to make an ultimate decision about a family member.  The decision could be to allow the person to remain sustained via articial measures or allow them to pass away naturally.  Far from assisted suicide, and well within Christian norms of Pastoral Counseling and Care, one can make the decision that frees a family members from the bondage of suffering.  The person has fought the good fight and carried his cross finally to his personal Calvary, now he

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Pastoral Care for the Dying

Pastoral Care for the Dying

Pastoral Care and Compassion for the Dying More and more people are recognizing the need for pastoral care of the dying.  The fear of dying alone or without compassion is one of the biggest concerns of the dying. Colette Douglas Home of the HearldScotland writes about the need of pastoral care and love for the dying to ease the transition from life to death in her article “We Need a Human Touch on the Pathway to Dying”. ASK anyone if they fear death and nine times out of 10 they’ll tell you: “I’m not afraid of being dead but I’m

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Palliative Care and the Dying

Palliative Care and the Dying

Palliative Care and Death Pastoral Care givers are thrilled that more options are becoming more available for dying patients to live their remaining lives at home and in decency.  Federal laws are looming that may help families afford this option and give their loved ones some peace in their final days. Irma Faith Pal of Inquirer News writes about the growing need of good and affordable Palliative Care in her article, “Palliative Care: Helping the Dying “To Live Until He Dies” For any family, it is devastating to hear doctors say there is nothing more they can do for the

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Pastoral Care Givers – Denial: Is it Dangerous?

Pastoral Care Givers – Denial: Is it Dangerous?

Pastoral Care Counselors and Dealing with Denial of Patients Elizabeth Kubler Ross identifies denial as the first response to grief.  She considers it to be a natural reaction to sudden and horrible news.  In her seminar on the dying, she hoped to share with pastoral care counselors, health care professionals and ministers the necessity of denial in the progress through grief. While not everyone follows the same pattern of grieving, pastoral care givers can be assured to witness many cases of denial.  The looming question, however, is when can denial become dangerous, if it ever even can be? Kubler Ross experienced one case of a woman who