. .

Request Information

Would you like information on our Certification and Education programs?

To access our online Request Form: click here

Visit our Web Site

AIHCP.ORG

access here

Grief Counseling Articles & Discussion

AIHCP Magazine, Articles, Discussions

Access Archive Posts

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 84 other subscribers

case management

Last Tweets

Category: Pastoral Thanatology RSS feed for this category

0

Pastoral Care Looks to Change Traditional Nursing Home Settings

Pastoral Care Looks to Change Traditional Nursing Home Settings

  Pastoral Care and Alternative Nursing Home Settings Unfortunately not every person is healthy enough to enjoy hospice or healthy enough to remain at home in their later years.  This reality has led many to try to reinvent ways to make the nursing home experience a more pleasant experience.  Pastoral Care combined with new and innovative nursing home settings can help the elderly feel “human again” Helen Dennis, in her article, “Alternatives to Traditional Nursing Homes” explores this idea and identifies a plan that could possible change nursing homes. Last week we discussed what to ask and observe when visiting nursing homes

0

Pastoral Help For the Entire Family During Terminal Illness

Pastoral Help For the Entire Family During Terminal Illness

Pastoral Care for the Whole Family Pastoral Help sometimes does not touch upon the needs of every family member or various feelings that identify the family as a whole.  It is important to meet the needs of the patient’s family while the patient approaches death. One of the first steps a pastoral caregiver can do is normalize any feelings within the family.  Some family members may be experiencing secondary losses.  They may feel angry at the dying person.  It is important to let them know that this does not make them bad or that this does not mean they do

0

Pastoral Care and the Rights of the Dying

Pastoral Care and the Rights of the Dying

Caring for the Dying and Their Rights It is so common to speak about the dying and the  rights of the dying instead of to them.  They almost become the giant elephant in the room.  However, from a spiritual and ethical prism, the dying have rights that must be preserved and respected.  As people they have human rights and their needs, concerns and issues need to be met with compassion and professionalism.  In caring for the dying, we must remember these five rights. The first rights of the dying is that they have a right to know as much of the truth that

0

The Pastoral Care Giving Provider as an Exquisite Witness

The Pastoral Care Giving Provider as an Exquisite Witness

What is an Exquisite Witness in Pastoral Care? In Pastoral Care, one crosses the line of just merely a provider but also a spiritual friend.  A friend who is there to comfort and reassure the spiritual and emotional element of a patient.  An Exquisite Witness is one who personifies this element of care of the dying. From a defintion, an Exquisite Witness is a ”health care, pastoral, or volunteer care provider  who enters the sacred space between two human souls-having the deepest respect for the yearning, seeking, and wishful hopes of the other to diminish the pain and survive in a new world after a loss.” Beyond

1

Cultural Diversity in Care Giving

Cultural Diversity in Care Giving

Caregivers Need to be Culturally Sensative to Their Patient’s Needs As the world has become smaller, interaction with other creeds, cultures and races has become more prevelant in all aspects of life.  Caregiving is no exception as doctors, nurses, pastoral counselors and other caregivers find themselves in direct contact with different cultures who demand and deserve certain care. Within the area of grief, it is essential, according to John Bowlby, that we understand cross-cultural ideals, especially in grief to better provide the vital care patients need.  Rituals, mourning, and family interaction varies from culture to culture and  health care providers need to respect these particular cultures in their

0

Who Cares About the Pastoral Caregivers?

Who Cares About the Pastoral Caregivers?

Pastoral Care for the One Who Cares the Most My grandmother cared tirelessly for my grandfather and as his health gradually deterioated he became more needy in his everyday activities.  Fortunately for my grandfather, my grandmother was a nurse and knew how to care for someone who was gradually becoming less and less physically capable.  Her energy level was amazing and my grandfather through the final two surgeries received top notch care and affection.  After my grandfather’s eventual death, my grandmother finally slowed down some herself, almost as if her body knew she no longer was needed everyday.   Still alive, still moving, but now with a cane,

0

Pastoral Care and Use of Advance Directives

Pastoral Care and Use of Advance Directives

Pastoral Care Giving and Advance Directives It is important in Pastoral Care to also ensure that the needs of the dying patient are met in full.  This not only involves physical and spiritual support but also helping one fulfill their end desires for themselves or family.  Advance Directives are essential elements in knowing exactly what the dying patient would want or wish if he/she is unconscious or unresponsive in his/her final hours. An Advance Medicial Directive can solve many problems in regards to who takes charger in an event if the person loses consciousness.  It also lays out groundwork for care givers and medicial providers to

0

St. Camillus, Patron of Physicians, Pastoral Caregivers

St. Camillus, Patron of Physicians, Pastoral Caregivers

A Saint for Pastoral Caregivers to Model Themselves After St. Camillus of Lellis was born in 1550, oringally a soldier only to become a pastoral caregiver to the sick and wounded of war.  This saint founded the The Order of the Camillans who assisted at battlefields, served in hospitals, and went out to the streets to care for the sick. The Order of the Camillans to this day is the symbol of the red cross as it spreads its sacred mission to find Christ in the least of one’s brethren.  The Order’s comittment is so strong that they even take a fourth vow.  This vow states

0

Euthanasia: A Pastoral Care Paradox?

Euthanasia: A Pastoral Care Paradox?

Pastoral Care and Euthanasia Many in pastoral care are faced with the dilemma of euthanasia.  Although banned in many states, the right to die movement is a powerful one.  This movement, however, is far from pastoral.  It may paint images of taking someone out of their misery with compassion or ironically tying the words “mercy” and “killing” together, but if one looks beyond this, one will find nothing pastoral regarding euthanasia. Euthansia is murder.  It is that simple and those who seek to bring Christ to the dying and wish to represent a pastoral element can never condone it.  Euthanais is suicide of despair.  It is the

0

Hospice and Pastoral Care

Hospice and Pastoral Care

Hospice and Pastoral Care Giving For many the choice of hospice is a painful one.  Intrinsic to hospice is the idea that one has given up and medicine can no longer save one’s loved one.  One feels defeat and dismay but the reality is one is freeing him or herself from the bondage of self and accepting the will of Christ.  Pastoral Care Givers have an opportunity to help others accept the final leg of their journey.  They can also help families learn acceptance and find some joy in the final days.  Furthermore, once prolongation of life is no longer the goal, then comfort becomes