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Category: Pastoral Thanatology RSS feed for this category

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Certification in Pastoral Thanatology–Hospice: What is it and when is it for you? – CNN.com

Certification in Pastoral Thanatology–Hospice: What is it and when is it for you? – CNN.com

Ten things you should know about hospice care that you probably didn’t already. Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.cnn.com A great article about the basics of Hospice and how it can help you or a loved family member. If you are interested in grief counseling or a certification in Pastoral Thanatology, then please review the program and see if it matches your academic and professional needs #pastoralthanatologycertification

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Doctors Are Poorly Trained in End-of-Life Care, but That Can Change

Doctors Are Poorly Trained in End-of-Life Care, but That Can Change

Health care providers do a poor job preparing people for critical decisions Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.scientificamerican.com A good article about the need for doctors to be more intune with the need of their patient’s needs at end of life care that go well beyond just the physical.  Terminally ill need spiritual and emotional care as well If you would like to become certified in Pastoral Thanatology, then please review the program #pastoralthanatologytraining

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An invaluable lesson about a “good death” for nurses/doctors

An invaluable lesson about a “good death” for nurses/doctors

I became a physician because I was excited by the idea of helping people every day. Following a lifelong fascination with science, I found myself in medical sc Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.mightynurse.com Good article about not just treating the body who is dying but also the entire person and how doctors can be more compassionate and sensitive to the whole person If you would like to learn more about pastoral thanatology then please review our program #pastoralthanatology

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Hospice Care Decreases Depression Symptoms In Surviving Spouses, Study Finds

Hospice Care Decreases Depression Symptoms In Surviving Spouses, Study Finds

Patients being placed in hospice care aren’t the only ones eligible to receive services. Family members can also benefit from the wide range of medical, spiritual and emotional resources being offered by a palliative care facility. A new study took a look at the spouses of seriously ill patients and found that hospice [...] Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.forbes.com We sometimes think most about Pastoral Care for the dying with hospice but a recent study shows it can also help the survivors who cared for the terminally ill.  Surviving family can find solace in a peaceful and happy death of a loved one

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Can hospice care reduce depression in the bereaved? – Harvard Health Blog

Can hospice care reduce depression in the bereaved? – Harvard Health Blog

A recent study found that post-death hospice services may help loved ones and family members get the mental health services they need after a loss. Source: www.health.harvard.edu A better end to one’s life that treats the full human dignity of the dying is essential to keep spirits high and hope alive.  Hospice and Pastoral care can offer this to the dying. If you are interested in learning more about pastoral care for the dying and Pastoral Thanatology Courses, then please review the program

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Hospice Care May Help Both The Terminally Ill And Their Surviving Spouses

Hospice Care May Help Both The Terminally Ill And Their Surviving Spouses

  The grief of losing a loved one to a terminal illness may be easier to recover from when they receive hospice care. Source: www.medicaldaily.com This is a good article about how hospice can make the final days not only more pleasant for the dying but also the caregivers. If you would like to learn more about Pastoral Thanatology Courses, then please review the program #pastoralthanatology

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Hospital staff needs grief care, too

Hospital staff needs grief care, too

Nurses, social workers, clergy members and doctors hold the hands of the grieving, radiate calm in the face of anger and blame, and deliver news that leaves patients and their families without words. But no amount of training and experience can steel them against their own pain. Source: www.dispatch.com Care workers, pastoral and healthcare alike, have alot of grief to deal with.  Patients and work can cause burn out for care workers.  This article looks at how hospital staff needs grief care as well If you would like to learn more about Pastoral Care for the dying training, then please

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Online tools for living wills, power of attorney make process easier

Online tools for living wills, power of attorney make process easier

Online tools have made the process easier for establishing a durable power of attorney for health care to help guide family, friends and health care providers if you become incapacitated. Source: www.reviewjournal.com Fear of death as a taboo subject prevents us discussing it. This is dangerous when the importance of discussion can save family and friends turmoil after death.  Whether terminal or young and healthy, advanced directives and a living will are important If you would like to learn more about pastoral care counseling training, then please review the program #pastoralcarecounselingtraining

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Hospice Program Comforts Dying Veterans

Hospice Program Comforts Dying Veterans

“I started out in Southern France and ended up in Belgium,” is how Palmer Gaetano describes his army service in World War II. The 92-year old lives in a Source: wxxinews.org This is an excellent article about end of life care for those who gave their energy and possible lives for our freedom. Our veterans deserve the best and end of life care should be a priority. If you would like to learn more about pastoral care and pastoral thanatology, then please review the program #pastoralcareandpastoralthanatology

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Dying patients’ choices not always aligned to caregivers’

Dying patients’ choices not always aligned to caregivers’

An illuminating study compares the willingness of stage IV cancer patients, and their caregivers; to pay to extend their lives by one year against that of other end-of-life improvements. Source: www.sciencedaily.com The compromising question of the value for the buck comes into play with terminally ill patients and extraordinary measures of prolonging life. If you would like to learn more about Pastoral Thanatology Training, then please review the program and see how it matches your academic and professional needs #pastoralthanatologytraining