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Pet Loss Grief Counseling Training Program Article On Pets and Why They Matter

Pets are part of our lives and for some, even like family.  Hence the value of something or someone determines the pain of loss.  It is of no wonder then that so many grieve the loss of a pet so intensely

Pets mean a lot to people.  Please also review our pet loss grief counseling training program

Pets mean a lot to people. Please also review our pet loss grief counseling training program

Please also review our Pet Loss Grief Counseling Training Program

The article, Why does the death of a pet matter to us so much?, by William Reville states

“Our Bichon Frise dog Milo died on June 6th. My wife and I were very much taken aback by the level of grief that Milo’s passing precipitated. Such grief is common among pet owners when their pet dies. I have looked into the psychology that underpins this phenomenon and found a very helpful article published on May 17th, 2016, by Julie Axelrod on PsychCentral, an independent mental health social network – https://psychcentral.com/lib/grieving-the-loss -of-a-pet/.

Milo was born in September 2005, so he died just short of his 12th birthday. Dogs don’t live nearly as long as humans and you can calculate equivalent human age by multiplying the dog’s age by six. Milo was therefore about 70 years old in human equivalent terms. He was very healthy throughout his life but developed a kidney tumour and went down quickly at the end. Little could be done medically and we nursed him at home in our living room. He seemed to be in no pain. We talked to him a lot and he responded, even as he grew very weak. Two days before he died he went into a deep sleep and didn’t awaken. Our vet, Dr Pat O’Doherty of Gilabbey Veterinary Hospital, helped Milo in his last days, advising us at every step of the way, which was a big comfort.

We bought Milo as a pup in 2005, shortly before the second of our two boys left to join his brother in the UK, where they have both lived since. Our household for most of the last 12 years therefore consisted of my wife, myself and Milo. We were unprepared for the grief that struck us in Milo’s last days and when he died. I think it would be helpful for all dog owners to realise from the start that they are almost certainly going to outlive their dog and that when the dog dies they will experience significant grief.”

To read the entire article, please click here

Please also review our Pet Loss Grief Counseling Training Program

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