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Substance Abuse Counseling Program Article on Medicaid and Substance Abuse Care

How will reductions in Medicaid affect substance abuse care?

Please review our substance abuse counseling program

Please review our substance abuse counseling program

Please also review our substance abuse counseling program

The article,”¬†Feds, states seek to end Medicaid’s limits on substance abuse care”, by Virgil Dickson states,

“States and some federal officials are working harder to end some limits on Medicaid reimbursements for behavioral health and substance abuse treatment in the face of the nationwide opioid addiction crisis.

Earlier this month, a bipartisan group of senators introduced legislation that eases federal restrictions on Medicaid reimbursement for substance use disorder treatment centers. The bill would allow centers with up to 40 beds to receive reimbursement from Medicaid for stays of up to 60 consecutive days.

Medicaid has refused to pay for care from so-called institutions of mental disease for beneficiaries 21 years old and older since its inception. Most residential treatment facilities for mental health and substance-use disorders that have more than 16 beds did not qualify for Medicaid reimbursement.

“It’s no exaggeration to say that an available bed at a treatment facility could mean the difference between life and death. In fact, one of the most tragic circumstances is when someone is ready to seek help and they’re turned away because of a lack of resources,” Sen. Angus King (I-Maine) said in a statement.

King is one of the co-sponsors of the bill known as the Medicaid Coverage for Addiction Recovery Expansion Act, or Medicaid CARE Act. It’s unclear if the law will ever be enacted, despite its bipartisan support, as Republican lawmakers and President Donald Trump are actively seeking ways to reduce Medicaid spending.

The lawmakers’ proposal comes after several states have successfully lobbied the CMS to lift these restrictions for their Medicaid programs. California, Maryland, Massachusetts and Virginia have succeeded in getting waivers to remove the bed-limit restriction for Medicaid funding.

A federal solution could eliminate inefficiencies and differences in state requests and create a single standard for behavioral and substance abuse treatment reimbursement, according to Dr. Jonathan Chen, an instructor at Stanford University School of Medicine who has researched opioid abuse.”

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