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Substance Abuse Counselor Training Article on College Substance Abuse

Good article on substance abuse and the threat of substance abuse on college campuses.

College drinking is still a problem. Please review our Substance Abuse Counseling Training

College drinking is still a problem. Please review our Substance Abuse Counseling Training

Please also review our Substance Abuse Counselor Training

The article, The threat of substance abuse to college students, by Ashton Nanninga states, 

“The opioid crisis has become a serious threat to public health, but from where does the drug abuse stem? Under the Controlled Substances Act, drugs have been categorized into their respective classes ranging from Schedule I to Schedule V. Schedule V is the lowest containing drugs such as codeine and other common substances used in cold/flu medicines. As the scheduling moves toward the lower numbers, the drug classifications intensify.

According to the DEA, “Schedule I drugs, substances, or chemicals are defined as drugs with no currently accepted medical use and a high potential for abuse.” These include heroin, marijuana, ecstasy, peyote, etc. However, alcohol is not listed in any of the schedule categories.

Alcohol is exempt from the Controlled Substances Act. Why is this? Does it not have high potential for abuse? As a nation, alcohol use has become so normalized that we no longer consider it a drug. Today, we say “drugs and alcohol” as if they do not fall under the same umbrella or have similar effects on the body. We are not giving alcohol its deserved addictive attention. Alcohol overuse is a continuous threat to public health. It is responsible for more deaths than the opioid crisis, up to 88,000 per year. So why haven’t we been paying attention?”

To read the entire article, please click here

Please also review our Substance Abuse Counselor Training

 

 

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