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Substance Abuse: Fruits of the Fallen Family

Sustance Abuse, the Family and Children

Bad family life leads to substance abuse among children and teens

Bad family life leads to substance abuse among children and teens

Substance Abuse counselors no doubt encounter common themes with their patients.  One common denominator would probably be bad family life.  While not always the case, undoubtedly, it is probably usually the case.

The sad plight of the American family since the cultural revolution of the 60s has led to a decay of the traditional family and its values.  Values that held strongly to a moral code, interfamily communication, order, and support.  These values have been become weakened with the infusion of moral subjectivism and materialism.

The case of materialism is especially striking.  Potentially due to worse economic times, families strive for the dollar over quality time.  Without a home maker, children are less and less supervised by the parents and fall victim to idle time and lack of guidance, falling prey to various social “isms”.  In this idle time, replacing the dinner table, family board games, and a close emotional tie is the rise of video games and the internet.  Regular social norms that take place in the real world are now replaced with artifical ways of communicaton.   These artifical ways of communication also open the children to a wave of information previously unattainable.  A simple click of the mouse and the teen or child is flooded with information that may not be suitable.  Of course, if the parents are too busy to find time, despite their own schedule, then these ideals from television and the internet become more of an influence over their child.

The situation is even worse is split homes.  Divorce destroys the family structure and leaves children vulnerable to other sources.  Furthermore, depression and unresolved grief may affect the child.  These situations are breeding grounds for substance abuse.

What Can Be Done?

Regardless if a family is still married or divorce, parents must find time for their child.  The simple gesture of love and its ability to help a child grow is the difference.  Listening to your child, partaking in his or her interests, doing things outside, and just giving them a hug when they are sad can make the biggest difference.  The question is how broken is this generation’s parenting skills?  Do parents wish to take time and realize that their child is their primary vocation before “me” time at the bar or if divorced, dating.  No matter how tired after work, a parent needs to make sure their child does what he or she is supposed to do, but beyond that, let them know you care and love them.  Let them know that their concerns matter and let them know that you want to do things with them and be part of their life.

While some parents may form a friendship partnership with their children, it is sitll important that while being part of their life, there is a line between parent and child.  If done in love, this line will serve as an important basis for serving discipline with love and  forming of character.  The child needs to see the parent as someone he or she can talk to and have fun with but also hold for the parent that revered sense of respect.

Ultimately, the solution is simple in preventing substance abuse, yet are we, as parents, willing to sacrifice the “time”.

If you are interested in Substance Abuse Counseling, then please review the program.

AIHCP

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