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Tag: end of life care


The Price and Quality of End of Life Care

Pastoral Care Doesn’t Cost Anything But End of Life Decisions Can The high costs of end of life care are factors in pastoral care.  Some people can afford it and some cannot and pastoral care has to adjust to this.  Yet beyond the mere pastoral care element of caring for the dying, is the financial.  How can we increase quality and lower price?  There are many views on this. Ezekiel Emanual of the New York Times writes about finding better care for less in is article, “Better, if not, Cheaper Care” To read the entire article, please click here If


Doctors Need to Realize the Importance of End of Life Care

Doctors Need to Realize the Importance of End of Life Care

Pastoral Care Provides Relief for the Entire Personhood of Someone Who is Dying   End of life care involves treating the entire person beyond the physical symptoms.  Pastoral Care takes this to another level when the pastoral care giver treats the entirety of the person. Patti Singer, a writer for Democrat and Chronicle.com, explores how doctors are beginning to see and understand the importance of spiritual and emotional care of the dying in her article, “Doctor Shares Vision of Care for the Dying. End-of-life care provides an opportunity — not to deliver the most care, but to provide the best


Christian Dignity and End of Life Care

Christian Dignity and End of Life Care

Dying with Christian Dignity Everyone’s ultimate cross and fate lies in death. For some death will come peacefully, others violently, while others will fight it to the end or meekly accept it. Whichever the case, all deserve dignity in their final moments. The Christian faith accepts death with dignity as a way of transformation from the temporal state to the eschatological state. In this transformation, life does not cease, but continues and is enhanced in the beatific vision for the just. Ultimately, even the temporal form of man, his body, will again taste life in the general resurrection. Christianity faces