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Tag: hospice


Alternatives to the Nursing Home – Pastoral Care Program

Alternatives to the Nursing Home –  Pastoral Care Program

Pastoral Care Program Beyond the Nursing Home Pastoral Care for the elder community is reaching new heights as the baby boomer generation reaches their golden years.  Nursing homes are becoming not the only refuge for the elderly.  With hospice and other programs, the elderly and the sick can find a variety of options.  The article below highlights the other options than nursing homes and hospice. This  to Manish Sahajwani of the San Francisco Chronicle.  In the article, “Alternatives to Nursing Homes”, she lists a variety of other options for seniors. According to the U.S.  Census Bureau, by 2050 more than


Euthanasia: A Pastoral Care Paradox?

Euthanasia: A Pastoral Care Paradox?

Pastoral Care and Euthanasia Many in pastoral care are faced with the dilemma of euthanasia.  Although banned in many states, the right to die movement is a powerful one.  This movement, however, is far from pastoral.  It may paint images of taking someone out of their misery with compassion or ironically tying the words “mercy” and “killing” together, but if one looks beyond this, one will find nothing pastoral regarding euthanasia. Euthansia is murder.  It is that simple and those who seek to bring Christ to the dying and wish to represent a pastoral element can never condone it.  Euthanais is suicide of despair.  It is the


Hospice and Pastoral Care

Hospice and Pastoral Care

Hospice and Pastoral Care Giving For many the choice of hospice is a painful one.  Intrinsic to hospice is the idea that one has given up and medicine can no longer save one’s loved one.  One feels defeat and dismay but the reality is one is freeing him or herself from the bondage of self and accepting the will of Christ.  Pastoral Care Givers have an opportunity to help others accept the final leg of their journey.  They can also help families learn acceptance and find some joy in the final days.  Furthermore, once prolongation of life is no longer the goal, then comfort becomes