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Tag: pastoral care givers

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Local hospice and pastoral care givers provides comfort in final days

Local hospice and pastoral care givers provides comfort in final days

  Updated to reflect Minnie Scott fits the criteria for hospice American Institute Health Care Professionals‘s insight: Hospice care is critical for many terminally ill and aging seniors.  Pastoral Care givers can help in a proper hospice setting where seniors can receive pastoral care in a home like setting.  This comfort is a wonderful gift for their last days. #pastoralcarecertification See on www.oanow.com

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Pastoral Care Givers and the Terminally Ill

Pastoral Care Givers and the Terminally Ill

Do no harm. This is the key in all medicial practice and pastoral care philosophies. However, the question of causing harm to alleviating suffering has becom… American Institute Health Care Professionals‘s insight: This video looks at a religious and pastoral view on euthanasia and how pastoral care givers should protect life at all times.  The video reviews extraordinary and ordinary conditions in preserving life and their differences.  Do no harm is the ultimate rule of all care givers! #coursesforpastoralcare See on www.youtube.com

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Pastoral Care Givers – Denial: Is it Dangerous?

Pastoral Care Givers – Denial: Is it Dangerous?

Pastoral Care Counselors and Dealing with Denial of Patients Elizabeth Kubler Ross identifies denial as the first response to grief.  She considers it to be a natural reaction to sudden and horrible news.  In her seminar on the dying, she hoped to share with pastoral care counselors, health care professionals and ministers the necessity of denial in the progress through grief. While not everyone follows the same pattern of grieving, pastoral care givers can be assured to witness many cases of denial.  The looming question, however, is when can denial become dangerous, if it ever even can be? Kubler Ross experienced one case of a woman who

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Pastoral and Spiritual Care of a Coma Patient

Pastoral Care for the Coma Patient   Pastoral and Spiritual Care for those in a coma is important because one cannot ascertain if the patient is totally unconscious or not. In this way, pastoral care givers should treat the coma patient as if conscious.  Furthermore, the spiritual energy and presence can also communicate without any sensible connection.  Albeit many deny the metaphysical realm, I would contend as a one of the faithful that such connection would exist. Sara from the Institute of HeartMath writes in her article “The Effects of Compassionate Presence on People in Comas” about the sense of positive energy that can

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Patient Assisted Suicide Possibly in Massachusetts

Patient Assisted Suicide Possibly in Massachusetts

Pastoral Care Givers and Assisted Suicide in Massachusetts   The issue of Patient Assisted Suicide became a national controvery when Oregon first passed a bill that allowed it in the late 90s.  Now Massachusetts is proposing a similar bill.  Many people may support this idea but there are many Pastoral Care Givers who oppose it.  In the article below from Lifenews.com, the concerns regarding this bill are analyzed. Dr. Jacqueline Harvery writes on Patient Assisted Suicide in her article “Massachusetts’ Assisted Suicide Proposal: Concerns on Question 2″ and how it may not be beneficial to those of the state. The

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Pastoral Care and Respecting Life To The End Right

Pastoral Care and Respecting Life To The End Right

Right to Die and Pastoral Care? Does Pastoral Care and the aid in helping the suffering patient find death compatable? Many find confusion in this gray area of what is right or wrong.  This ethical quicksand seems to have no clear cut answer at times.  While, as care givers, we understand the reality of extraordinary measures and ordinary measures of preservation of life, but when one comes into contact with such suffering, it becomes difficult to resort to a text book answer. This is the same mental anguish Daniel Kreiger faced in the death of his own mother.  In his

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Pastoral Care and the Rights of the Dying

Pastoral Care and the Rights of the Dying

Caring for the Dying and Their Rights It is so common to speak about the dying and the  rights of the dying instead of to them.  They almost become the giant elephant in the room.  However, from a spiritual and ethical prism, the dying have rights that must be preserved and respected.  As people they have human rights and their needs, concerns and issues need to be met with compassion and professionalism.  In caring for the dying, we must remember these five rights. The first rights of the dying is that they have a right to know as much of the truth that

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Euthanasia: A Pastoral Care Paradox?

Euthanasia: A Pastoral Care Paradox?

Pastoral Care and Euthanasia Many in pastoral care are faced with the dilemma of euthanasia.  Although banned in many states, the right to die movement is a powerful one.  This movement, however, is far from pastoral.  It may paint images of taking someone out of their misery with compassion or ironically tying the words “mercy” and “killing” together, but if one looks beyond this, one will find nothing pastoral regarding euthanasia. Euthansia is murder.  It is that simple and those who seek to bring Christ to the dying and wish to represent a pastoral element can never condone it.  Euthanais is suicide of despair.  It is the

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Hospice and Pastoral Care

Hospice and Pastoral Care

Hospice and Pastoral Care Giving For many the choice of hospice is a painful one.  Intrinsic to hospice is the idea that one has given up and medicine can no longer save one’s loved one.  One feels defeat and dismay but the reality is one is freeing him or herself from the bondage of self and accepting the will of Christ.  Pastoral Care Givers have an opportunity to help others accept the final leg of their journey.  They can also help families learn acceptance and find some joy in the final days.  Furthermore, once prolongation of life is no longer the goal, then comfort becomes