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Tag: pastoral thanatology certification

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In the shadow of death: life as a palliative care nurse

In the shadow of death: life as a palliative care nurse

Karuna Hospice nurses Renee Wilson and Lea-Anne Tuaoi on finding joy and meaning in a life lived in the presence of death. Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.abc.net.au Great article about the life of a palliative nurse and her stories about death and dealing with the dying. A very personal story that goes well beyond the science of medicine and care, but also to the spiritual and emotional elements of caring for the dying If you would like to learn more about AIHCP’s Pastoral Thanatology Certification, then please review #pastoralthanatologycertification

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Seizing a Medicare Moment To Improve End-of-Life Care

Seizing a Medicare Moment To Improve End-of-Life Care

  It is crucial to ask people about what they want Sourced through Scoop.it from: time.com Good news with Medicare and end of life care as many services will now be covered.  With so many options now open to the elderly, physicians can help patients find what they need and want If you would like to learn more about our Pastoral Thanatology Certification, then please review the program #pastoralthantologycertification

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How to talk about death before it’s too late – Futurity

How to talk about death before it’s too late – Futurity

Talking to family and health care providers about palliative care, hospice, and death is important, though often uncomfortable. Here are some tips. Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.futurity.org It is critically to talk about death before its too late.  Because of societal taboos, death talk is usually started too late before anyone has an idea of what the loved one wants done after his or her passing.  This article emphasizes the importance of healthy discussions regarding death If you would like to learn more about bereavement counseling training and a pastoral thanatology certification then please review #pastoralthanatologycertification

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Hospice Care Decreases Depression Symptoms In Surviving Spouses, Study Finds

Hospice Care Decreases Depression Symptoms In Surviving Spouses, Study Finds

Patients being placed in hospice care aren’t the only ones eligible to receive services. Family members can also benefit from the wide range of medical, spiritual and emotional resources being offered by a palliative care facility. A new study took a look at the spouses of seriously ill patients and found that hospice [...] Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.forbes.com We sometimes think most about Pastoral Care for the dying with hospice but a recent study shows it can also help the survivors who cared for the terminally ill.  Surviving family can find solace in a peaceful and happy death of a loved one

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Healthcare 101: 5 Ways to Help the Elderly in the Aging Process

Healthcare 101: 5 Ways to Help the Elderly in the Aging Process

Healthcare 101: 5 Ways to Help the Elderly in the Aging Process and Pastoral Thanatology Certification   The Administration on Aging (AoA) reports the percentage of Americans 65 and older will reach nearly 20% by 2030 stretching this country’s resources dedicated to caring for the elderly. Whether you are a care provider, family member or just interested in making a difference; there are a number of ways to help the elderly in the aging process. Navigating Health Care Many of the elderly in this country are not equipped to manage their own health. Encouraging the elderly to establish a relationship

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Christian Dignity and End of Life Care

Christian Dignity and End of Life Care

Dying with Christian Dignity Everyone’s ultimate cross and fate lies in death. For some death will come peacefully, others violently, while others will fight it to the end or meekly accept it. Whichever the case, all deserve dignity in their final moments. The Christian faith accepts death with dignity as a way of transformation from the temporal state to the eschatological state. In this transformation, life does not cease, but continues and is enhanced in the beatific vision for the just. Ultimately, even the temporal form of man, his body, will again taste life in the general resurrection. Christianity faces