. .

Request Information

Would you like information on our Certification and Education programs?

To access our online Request Form: click here

Visit our Web Site

AIHCP.ORG

access here

Grief Counseling Articles & Discussion

AIHCP Magazine, Articles, Discussions

Access Archive Posts

Last Tweets

Case Management Program Article on Opioids and Cancer Patients

Good article how Opioid stimga is resulting in those who need them in cancer care, not getting the doses they require.

 

Please also review our Case Management Program

Please also review our Case Management Program

Please also review our Case Management Program, as well as our Substance Abuse Program

The article, “Opioid stigma is keeping many cancer patients from getting the pain control they need” by Sara Ray and Kathleen Hoffman states

istory is repeating itself. Twenty years ago, a pain management crisis existed. As many as 70 percent of cancer patients in treatment at that time, or in end-of-life care, experienced unalleviated pain. Identified as a major medical problem, poor pain management became synonymous with poor medical care. In fact, prescribing adequate pain medication became mandatory for hospital accreditation.

The medications used to treat moderate to severe pain among people with cancer are the same opioids helping fuel today’s opioid crisis. Though it has turned a much-needed spotlight on the overprescription of these medications, it is overshadowing their underprescription among people who really need them, especially those with cancer. Two-thirds of individuals with metastatic cancer and more than half of those being treated for cancer report experiencing chronic pain, and 1 in 3 cancer patients do not receive medication appropriate for the intensityof their pain.

To get a sense of how people living with cancer are being treated for pain at a time when there is a growing stigma associated with opioid use, we reviewed 140 public posts on Inspire, the health social network we work for, written by 100 people with cancer and their caregivers. Although the writers spanned many cancer types, they primarily represented lung, bladder, and advanced breast cancer. In general, they described facing stigma from both health care providers and society in general.”

To read the entire article, please click here

 

Please also review our Case Management Program

 

Leave a Reply